U.S. Launched Cyber Attacks on Iran After Drone Shootdown

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U.S. Launched Cyber Attacks on Iran After Drone Shootdown | #TpromoCom #Cyber #Hacker #Drone | U.S. military cyber forces launched a strike against Iranian military computers that crippled computers used to control rocket and missile launches, U.S. officials said Saturday.

US President Donald Trump is said to have secretly authorized US Cyber Command to carry out a retaliatory cyber attack on Iran in response to Iran’s downing of a U.S. surveillance drone.

The action by U.S. Cyber Command was a demonstration of the U.S.’s increasingly mature cyber military capabilities and its more aggressive cyber strategy under the Trump administration.

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With FAA’s blessing, that drone over your house may be Google’s Wing, not Amazon’s

With FAA’s blessing, that drone over your house may be Google’s Wing, not Amazon’s | #TpromoCom #Drone #Google #FAA | Wing, the drone delivery service spun off from Alphabet’s Google, hopes to start flights to homes and businesses in the Blacksburg and Christiansburg areas by the end of the year now that it has the blessings of the Federal Aviation Administration.

The FAA announced earlier this week that it had approved Wing as the first air carrier certified for drone delivery. In receiving the certification, Wing beat Amazon to the punch despite all the attention that the online merchandise giant has drawn over its interest in deliveries by air.

Both companies, along with others, have been racing to develop drones as a more cost-effective way of delivering small, high-value orders, like medicine. But drone delivery can have big drawbacks, with limitations on the weight of their cargo and the time it takes to recharge them between deliveries.

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New generation drones fly under the regulation radar

New generation drones fly under the regulation radar | #TpromoCom #Drone #Rules #Radar | While stricter global rules are coming, tiny machines can still be flown out of the box.

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I love drones. I have flown them on four continents and whether hovering low over a rough sea in Queensland or swooping down a valley in Transylvania, the feeling of almost becoming a bird always boosts the spirits.

The pre-Christmas drone fiasco at London’s Gatwick Airport did make it slightly embarrassing to be a fan, but drones are increasingly popular. The Federal Aviation Administration in the US expects sales to keep rising more than 25 per cent per year.

But under pressure because of incidents such as the Gatwick episode, legislators are trying to clamp down on drone abuse.

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Flir acquires Aeryon Labs for $200M

Flir acquires Aeryon Labs for $200M | #TpromoCom #Drones #Acquisition #Business | Flir Systems, Inc.  has acquired Aeryon Labs Inc., a leading developer of high-performance unmanned aerial systems (UAS) for the global military, public safety, and critical infrastructure markets for $200 million.


Rugged, reliable, and field-proven, Aeryon’s Skyranger UAS are rucksack portable and can be deployed in minutes by a single operator.

Aeryon’s vertical takeoff and landing quad-copter airframes integrate multiple sensors, including Flir thermal technology, to provide users with immediate high-resolution intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capability.

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Based in Waterloo, Canada, and with offices in Denver and Salt Lake City, Aeryon Labs was founded in 2007 and is a leading designer and manufacturer of mission-focused Group 1 UAS solutions built around aircraft under 20 pounds. Aeryon’s family of UAS are deployed by 20 militaries in over 30 countries around the world, including the United States Department of Defense. Aeryon develops UAS solutions that includes hardware, embedded software, ground control stations, sensors, software for flight operations, as well as supporting services for its global customers.

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Drone Security Cameras are the Smart Devices of the Future

Drone Security Cameras are the Smart Devices of the Future | #TpromoCom #Drone #Drones #Camera | Does your home feel insecure? This company wants to protect it with a camera drone.

Drones aren’t just fun toys for hobbyists or useful tools for professional videographers anymore. No, no, now they are going to start filling a new role: security cameras.

Does your home feel insecure? This company wants to protect it with a camera drone.

Sunflower Labs has announced at CES 2019 that they developed a system of high tech lights for your yard that integrates a flying camera drone that patrols your yard.

Now, like most new technology announcements from startups, we have no word on pricing or an exact release date yet. They did indicate that at first, the system will be quite expensive until they can start manufacturing at scale.

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Artificial Intelligence and the Security Dilemma

Artificial Intelligence and the Security Dilemma | #TpromoCom #AI #Drone #NationalSecurity | Recent breakthroughs in machine learning and artificial intelligence (A.I.) have prompted breathless speculation about their national security applications. Yet most of that work has focused narrowly on their implications for autonomous weapons systems, rather than on the broader security environment. Apart from Michael Horowitz and a handful of others, few scholars have sketched out how A.I. might affect core questions of international relations and foreign policy. (scroll down for more please)

One key challenge stands out: What influence will A.I. have on security dilemmas between great powers? With the two leading producers of A.I., the United States and China, already eyeing each other warily, the question is far from an idle one. If we are to maintain a stable international order, we need to better understand how artificial intelligence may exacerbate the security dilemma—and what to do about it.

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Editor’s Note: We know artificial intelligence will change the very nature of war—but we don’t know how. The United States, China, and other powers recognize this transformative potential and, even as they seek to exploit it, fear that others will gain the upper hand in an artificial intelligence arms race. My Brookings colleague Chris Meserole describes how artificial intelligence might produce a new security dilemma and proposes several ways to mitigate the risk. –Daniel Byman

 

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FAA bill to impact security industry

FAA bill to impact security industry | #TpromoCom #FAA #Security #Drones #Government |  Bill sets policies for not just drones but security technology as well. President Trump signed into law on Oct. 5, H.R. 302, the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018, a bill that provides a roadmap for FAA-related policies, programs and procedures that will impact the security industry in a number of ways, from the use of counter-drone measures to the expanded use of CCTV and biometric technology within airports.

Included in the new law is the Preventing Emerging Threats Act, which was a 2018 policy priority for the Security Industry Association, according to Joseph Hoellerer, government relations manager for SIA.

“Prior to the Preventing Emerging Threats Act being incorporated into the FAA reauthorization, there was a lot of legal uncertainty as to what DHS and DOJ could or could not do with counter-UAS [unmanned aircraft systems] technology and measures,” Hoellerer told Security Systems News, noting that the bill now provides DOJ and DHS with legal authority to counter UAS threats.

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