Chinese AI unicorns target smart cities & public security

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Chinese AI unicorns target smart cities & public security | #TpromoCom #AI #Military #Chinese | According to research company, Memoori, in a bid to be at the forefront of the technology, China is pouring billions of dollars into companies that are researching AI technology, with video analytics and IoT platforms for smart cities being two of the prime applications.

Memoori estimates that China accounts for approx. 31% of global physical security revenues and says that it is now the biggest single country market for physical security products having increased its share by almost 50% in the last 7 years.

Video surveillance equipment has been the major contributor here, with the market growing rapidly through a boom in new construction and safe city projects in the public sector. Hundreds of cities in China, large and small, have jumped on the smart cities bandwagon, as advocated by Beijing, and have established budgets to support such initiatives.

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A New Consensus Is Emerging On How to Handle The Risk from China’s 5G

A New Consensus Is Emerging On How to Handle The Risk from China’s 5G | #TpromoCom #China #Spy #5G | Chinese telecom tech is invading the physical world, but Europeans and industry have strategies to contain the threat.

“No one calls it an intelligence risk, but national security agencies across the world are concerned about China’s 5G modems and other devices,” says Al Colombo, Senior Design Specialist with TpromoCom of Canton, Ohio.

Much of the Western intelligence debate around Chinese high-speed 5G technology has focused on hardware and software. Once the hardware is already out in the wild — which most think is inevitable — the future of the fight is in managing risk. It’s doable, if not yet widely advertised, according to several experts speaking at a U.S. intelligence conference this week, by quarantining Chinese equipment and deploying smarter electromagnetic spectrum management tools to better handle threats.

Bottom line: Huawei leads the world in the ability to rapidly produce cheap telecom hardware (as well as the underlying software.) Recent reports, including one from NATO, state it plainly. It’s one reason why European countries, including U.S. allies like Germany and the U.K., have been reluctant to ban tech from Huawei outright, even in the face of heavy U.S. pressure.

To read the remainder of this extremely interesting and timely news article, click here.

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Artificial Intelligence and the Security Dilemma

Artificial Intelligence and the Security Dilemma | #TpromoCom #AI #Drone #NationalSecurity | Recent breakthroughs in machine learning and artificial intelligence (A.I.) have prompted breathless speculation about their national security applications. Yet most of that work has focused narrowly on their implications for autonomous weapons systems, rather than on the broader security environment. Apart from Michael Horowitz and a handful of others, few scholars have sketched out how A.I. might affect core questions of international relations and foreign policy. (scroll down for more please)

One key challenge stands out: What influence will A.I. have on security dilemmas between great powers? With the two leading producers of A.I., the United States and China, already eyeing each other warily, the question is far from an idle one. If we are to maintain a stable international order, we need to better understand how artificial intelligence may exacerbate the security dilemma—and what to do about it.

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Editor’s Note: We know artificial intelligence will change the very nature of war—but we don’t know how. The United States, China, and other powers recognize this transformative potential and, even as they seek to exploit it, fear that others will gain the upper hand in an artificial intelligence arms race. My Brookings colleague Chris Meserole describes how artificial intelligence might produce a new security dilemma and proposes several ways to mitigate the risk. –Daniel Byman

 

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Huawei looks to challenge US rivals by promising big investment in AI talent 

Huawei looks to challenge US rivals by promising big investment in AI talent | #TpromoCom #AI #China #Investment |  “At Huawei we don’t like the word transformation,” the telecom giant’s Rotating Chairman Eric Xu tells us via his interpreter. “What Huawei is doing isn’t transformation because that implies you’ve changed from A to B. What we’ve done instead is made progress and moved forward.”

Huawei looks to challenge US rivals by promising big investment in AI talent

Since its inception 56 years ago, artificial intelligence has succumbed to two winters where it suffered from a lack of funding and interest. However, as Xu rather poetically puts it, Winter always gives way to Spring, marking a new beginning for artificial intelligence and its pervasive capabilities.

The big announcements made from Huawei Connect in Shanghai prove that a lack of funding and investment will no longer be a worry for the AI industry. First was their full-stack, all-scenario AIportfolio which includes chips, chip enablement, a training and inference framework to “enable inclusive AI.”

To read the remainder of this most excellent news article, click here.

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Martin Gren on OEM and cyber security

Martin Gren on OEM and cyber security | #TpromoCom #OEM #CyberSecurity #CCTV |  In this Detektor TV Magazine video clip, Axis co-founder Martin Gren says he believes OEM will come to an end because of cyber security issues. He also gives his view on Axis’ biggest challenge, video surveillance and smart cities, and more.

“If you are a big integrator and you OEM a camera and put your name on it, then you probably have put some extensive work on skinning, to make sure the camera appears to be yours, and then when there is a cyber security upgrade, you need to renegotiate with the original manufacturer and have it to do the skinning once you have discovered a bug”, he says.

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Editor’s Note: There are those on the political Left who would have us all believe that the world is now a kinder, more gentler place than it was in the 1930s and 1940s, but the truth of the matter is, it’s actually a more dangerous place simply because of the convenience of technology. We must continue to be ever vigilant and watchful with regards to hacking as well as the deliberate placement of backdoors in software, as was recently discovered with regards to certain makes of cameras manufactured by certain Asian companies. –Al Colombo

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US tariffs on Chinese goods cause serious impact on security industry

US tariffs on Chinese goods cause serious impact on security industry | #TpromoCom #China #Tariffs #Government | Carlsbad, Ca (USA) — Following the news that the US Government will impose a 25% tariff on certain categories of products imported from the People’s Republic of China, Mike O’Neal, President of Nortech Security & Control, has written and published a letter addressed to the company’s clients explaining that the cost impact of these new tariffs will need to be mitigated and passed down through the supply chain. To read the rest of this interesting news article, click here.

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Editor’s Note: Listen, the solution to this problem is simple, but it lies with China, not United States trade policies. All China has to do is to reduce their trade tariffs so they are fair and in line with what ours once were. If they can do that, I assume that this President would consider reducing them to their previous levels.  Instead of blaming the current sitting President of the USA, perhaps we need to support his efforts to force China to play fair. –Al Colombo

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